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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  September 21, 2020 5:00am-6:01am BST

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you are with bbc news, i am sally bundock with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. leaked documents reveal how some uk banks have allowed criminals and money launderers to move billions around the world. england's chief medical officer wa nts england's chief medical officer wants the country is at a critical point as ministers consider new measures to stop the upsurge in coronavirus cases. joe biden calls on the us senate republicans to follow their conscience and not push through a new supreme court judge before november's presidential election. and an offbeat comedy show sweeps the
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board at the virtual emmy awards, winning seven. we begin with leaked documents that revealed how some of the uk's is known banks have allowed criminals, money launderers and sanctioned russians to move dirty money around the world. it shows that in london is a hub for money laundering with billions of dollars of suspected money moving through the financial system. the documents known as the fincen files were leaked to buzzfeed and shared with the
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bbc. in this unprecedentedly, thousands of reports of activity filed by banks were lea ked activity filed by banks were leaked to buzzfeed news and passed to the international consortium of investigative journalists at bbc panorama. they revealed some of the international banking systems most closely guarded secrets. in one example a payment of $8 million flagged as suspicious was sent to a russian businessman and former businessman and former businessman living in blitzen, vladimirjernigan. it came from this man, a billionaire ally of president putin. in 2018, he was sanctioned by the us who are targeting those who played a key role in advancing russia's milano if it is. his wife has become famous for donating large sums to the conservative party in exchange for tennis matches with david cameron and boris johnson for tennis matches with david cameron and borisjohnson and paying £135,000 for a night out with theresa may. in total, she
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has donated £1.7 million, most of it since her husband would she received the $8 million. the chernukins, pleasant people that they may be, not fit to make donations to a british political party and it feels really troubling. if you see the people are paying money into the conservative party coffers and getting this level of access and therefore presumably influence as a result. the conservative party said british russians have a democratic right to donate to a political party and the chernukins lawyers say chernukins lawyers say chernukin never received money coming from karimov, and mr karimov said he did not meet with chernukin. andy verity, bbc news. grant newsomejoints
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grant newsome joints me grant newsomejoints me and is an expert in the field. welcome to the programme. if i can get your reaction to these linked documents and what they show us. documents and what they show us. i wasn't surprised and i don't think anyone who follows theissues don't think anyone who follows the issues are surprised by anything they revealed. this has been a long—standing problem in the financial industry around the world, including london, the us, so this is nothing new. you really have some structural of them is that need to be addressed before there is any real progress made on this. in terms of london being a hub for money laundering, your views and thoughts on that and what this means going forward going for london? it's been a long time since london has a reputation for anything goes, anyone is welcome as long as they have money. you remember when the immolation airliner was shot
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down over ukraine, there was a quote from a banker in the city, this was after there was talk about putting sanctions on the russians, and the quote was, what will happen to their money? that has really typified how things have worked. what you have is, you have banks that don't really want, there isa that don't really want, there is a fundamental of them and the banks, front—office people, for them, business is bonus. if you are the people who are trying to keep bad customers, keep criminal money out of your bank, you have a completely different objective and that is to prevent business, to turn down customers so to prevent business, to turn down customers so you to prevent business, to turn down customers so you can see the tension and governments have something similar. most governments don't really want criminal money in ourfinancial systems but at the same time, the banks that handle this money a big campaign donors, they have a lot of influence, and if the government pulls a banking license and puts the
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ceo in prison requires it to pay fines out to his own funds, thatis pay fines out to his own funds, that is going to roll the entire economy see can see this tension in both government and the banking level and it creates a problem it's been long—standing, are you actually deal with it, probably the best thing a government could do is to make a ceo pay $1 billion out of his own resources and perhaps even put somebody in prison and put one of his big banks out of business. do you think that will ever happen? no, i really don't. i'm not being cynical or glib, but there have been so many opportunities in the last 15, 20 years to really hammer some of these respective banks, and send a message, and that really is the only thing that will work. it hasn't been done and i wa nt to work. it hasn't been done and i want to stress, the people on the front line in institutions, trying to keep the banks clean, they are doing their best, but they are doing their best, but they are doing their best, but they are not always getting the
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support they need and often, what financial institutions do, the equivalent of putting a scarecrow the equivalent of putting a scarecrow in a field, we have a lot of things, we spend a lot of money on knowing your customer, and it's really intended to be an excuse to keep the regulators at but there are some very clean institutions that see making a serious, diligent effort to turn down people that you shouldn't do business with, as a competitive advantage. as one thatis a competitive advantage. as one that is at the top of a prominent institution, asked him, do you mind giving a business and he said no, when people see what kind of company we are, we get more business as a result. this interesting. grant newsome, thank you for your time on your perspective on this leaked document that the bbc and others have seen. just to say, will have more than that. more on 20 minutes'
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time. in the's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty who will deliver a stark message the storm morning on the state of the coronavirus pandemic saying the uk stands ata pandemic saying the uk stands at a critical point. his briefing could lay the groundwork for further restrictions. ministers are said to be divided about how strict the measures should be stop if i could ask for two whitty and sue patrick islands. so professor chris whitty and patrick balance the mainstays of the press conferences when the viruses at their peak secret assume the briefing this morning with the latest data would not be good news. professor whitty is likely to say the uk is going in the wrong direction and a very challenging winter lies ahead. much of yesterday afternoon behind downing street's back door pouring over the data with the health secretary and chancellor and the prime
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minister himself. what's been consuming some of those inside number 10 consuming some of those inside number10 are consuming some of those inside number 10 are predictions that could be a significant rise in deaths over the next few months and was further action is taken. ministers agree this should not be a full national lockdown but there are tensions around the cabinet table of precisely which limited measures to take. people say they are simply looking for clarity. i think something 's gotta be done because do hear a lot of people, disobeying the rules, and it's affecting everyone. and a wake—up call is good. if there is a measure that can be taken to stop people doing things when they should be at home, protecting people. so be it. you could see the rule of six about location but there are so many anomalies. people don't quite know what is going on in finding £1000 when the could be a very legitimate reason they don't understand, all that's
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going to do is alienate people and it's only going to work if you get the public on your side. keeping people on site could be a challenge for the government because it does seem likely that some restrictions in areas of local lot downs, particularly in the leisure industry, it could be extended temporarily across england but the government's options haven't yet become firm decisions. in watson, bbc news. a partial lockdown has come into force in madrid, the restrictions for two weeks affect 850,000 people living mainly in densely populated areas in and around the south of madrid. residents will be banned from leaving their district other than essential travel like work, medical care or taking children to school. on sunday, people took to the streets and some of the affected district in pro test at the new measures. pubs in rural parts of ireland are said to be open for the first time since the start of the pandemic
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in march, pubs which only serve alcohol and not food, so—called wet pubs outside dublin, have been closed for the past six months but similar dubs in pub —— similar pubs in dublin itself can't open yet. they will have strict social distancing measures in place. the taj mahal has reopened to visitors in a symbolic business as usual gesture, even as india looks set to overtake the us as the global leader in coronavirus infections. the world—famous coronavirus infections. the world —famous mausoleum and coronavirus infections. the world—famous mausoleum and had been closed since march. strict social distancing rules have been imposed and daily visitor numbers will be capped at 5000, a quarter of the normal rate. india has recorded more than five 4 million covid cases, around 100,000 new infections and over 1000 deaths reported their daily. the democratic pa rty‘s their daily. the democratic party's presidential candidate, joe biden has said it would be
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an abuse of power if republican senators confirmed any us supreme court nominee put forward by donald trump before november's election. donald trump is rushing to fill the va ca ncy trump is rushing to fill the va ca ncy left by trump is rushing to fill the vacancy left by the death of ruth bader ginsburg. ruth bader ginsburg's seat and how its field is now a huge election issue. donald trump says he has made his nominee this week but with 43 days to go until the election, some ink that would be unfair, especially if america decides it's time for a new president and possibly a democrat —controlled senate. and possibly a democrat -controlled senate. look, i'm not being naive, i'm not speaking to president trump doing whatever he wants, i'm speaking to those republicans out there, senate republicans, who know deep down what is right for the country and consistent with the con to
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tuition as i stand here in the constitution centre, notjust what's best for their party. delaying the president's pick would need for republican senators to vote against their party. to have said there will, potentially there are more. party. to have said there will, potentially there are morelj think senator mitt romney is definitely going to be watched because he is one of president trump's assist critics among senate republicans. corey gardner is also facing one of the toughest real election campaigns in colorado. easier to say either way. unlike the president, joe biden says he will not announce his choice of supreme court but we do know, as he said it before, that is pick will be an african—american woman and that makes the short list extremely short because almost all supreme courtjudges since 1975 have come from the federal appeals court. and right now, they don't have a single female african—americanjudge
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they don't have a single female african—american judge there who is younger than 68 and age matters because supreme court judges serve for life to the favourite is a judge in california's supreme court. 44 yea rs california's supreme court. 44 years old, she was a clerk for former supreme courtjudge george stevens and served as an acting principal deputy during the obama administration. another potential pick has seven another potential pick has seve n yea rs another potential pick has seven yea rs experience another potential pick has seven years experience on the federal bench. either will be historic because 114judges have served in america's top courts in 1789, none of them has been an african—american woman but that is itjoe biden wins the election. the us supreme court gets the final say in america's used issues. what's not clear is whether the american people should get the final say on who sits on it in this upcoming election. paul hawkins, bbc news.
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two people have died in an explosion in the solomon islands. a british man and his australian colleague were killed in a block of flats in the capital at the headquarters ofan aid the capital at the headquarters of an aid agency. they were working on a project to find munitions left over from the second world war. the south pacific islands where the scene of intense battles and thousands of moms are still there. united states police have arrested a woman suspected of sending a poison field letter to president trump. she was detained in buffalo on the canada border and unconfirmed reports suggest she is a canadian citizen. the letter containing rice and was intercepted at a sorting office last week before it could reach the white house. a plaque demanding reform of the entire monarchy has been removed just less tha n monarchy has been removed just less than a day after it was cemented into the ground. it was placed near the grand palace during a mass protest in bangkok. it proclaimed that the
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country belongs to be people, not speaking. it is illegal to criticise the royal family in thailand. stay with us here in bbc news, still to come. we will find out how an offbeat riches to rags comedy show swept the board at the emmys. ben johnson, the fastest man on earth, is flying home to canada in disgrace. all the athletes should be clean going into the games. i'm just happy that justice is served. it is a simple fact that this morning, these people were in their homes. tonight, those homes have been burnt down by serbian soldiers and police. all the taliban positions along here have been strengthened, presumably in case the americans invade. it's no use having a secret service which cannot
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preserve its own secrets against the world, and so the british government has no option but to continue this action even after any adverse judgement in australia. concorde have crossed the atlantic faster than any plane ever before, breaking the record by six minutes. this is bbc news, the latest headlines: leaked documents reveal how some uk banks have allowed criminals and money launderers to move billions of pounds around the world. and england's chief medical officer warns that the countries that are critical point as ministers consider new measures to stop the in coronavirus cases. the winners of this years emmys awards have been revealed
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during a ceremony broadcast from a largely empty theatre in los angeles. tv stars accepted their awards at home and a canadian show called schitt‘s creek it was the guest winner of the night, taking every comedy prize on offer. the other big winners of the night we re other big winners of the night were succession and watchman. let's now talk this through with a television critic from the hollywood reporter. good to have you with us on the program. so, everyone is talking about schitt‘s creek and the success it is hard. what are you hearing about that? it is clearlyjust historically unprecedented. it won historically unprecedented. it wo n every historically unprecedented. it won every single comedy category at tonight's emmy which has basically never happened and it was the last yearfor happened and it was the last year for the show and it is pretty clear that they just really wa nted pretty clear that they just really wanted to give that show a really hearty sendoff. maybe
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a really hearty sendoff. maybe a little bit to the detriment of other shows that could have been winners. it is interesting isn't it because many who have been addicted to that show say that this is what got me through the global pandemic. it is interesting isn't it how this year's emmys reflect people and what they have been watching during this unprecedented time. yes, it is a very comforting show. it is a very heartwarming show, show thatis very heartwarming show, show that is exceedingly about family and decency and i think thatis family and decency and i think that is the of illusion, maybe, the kind of comfort that people are the kind of comfort that people a re really the kind of comfort that people are really craving right now. the really crazy part is that it was purchased to air primarily in the us on pop tv and pop tv actually dropped all of their original programming and so something like a netflix, ibrahim f like them has spent millions of dollars may be on trying to get as many awards as they can and a
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network like pop tv which has basically given up on programming is actually just, just became the night's biggest winner. it is a very ironic and happy situation, i think. and in terms of the winner in terms of the platform, was its netflix, hbo? who came out on top this time in that respect? it is definitely hbo because of watchmen. they took home four emmys including best limited series and best actress, and also for writing. and i think it is already a show that has been lauded since its debut as a really important show, a show that if you are a decent american, you should know the historical events that have been excavated by the show. and it certainly is an extremely timely show. and it went into the emmys were something like
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26 nominations. it was already the big head up and i think over delivered for hbo. we will definitely keep an eye out on what is happening next. thank you for being on the program. thank you. now to sport and the slovenian cyclists pogacar has won the tour to france after one of the most dramatic turna rounds tour to france after one of the most dramatic turnarounds in the race's history. it wasn't unusual and to the final stage but the winner had plenty of reasons to celebrate. the winner's champagne had to remain on ice for tadej pogacar, not because he's too young — he is 22 on monday — but the tradition of drinking it on the final stage to paris was banned this year because of coronavirus. on his special bike, pogacar was able to take in the accomplishment of becoming the second youngest winner with a clear head. amongst the famous landmarks, another one, sam bennett taking points in the intermediate sprint to become the first irishman for 31 years to win the green jersey. and it became a double celebration for bennett, powering past his rivals to finish
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a memorable three weeks. pogacar crossed the line moments later, ready to take his place on the biggest podium of all. but if these strange times end, he will get to enjoy his reign forjust nine months until the next tour de france. nick parrot, bbc news. let's bring you the rest of the sport's news. hello, iam sport's news. hello, i am gavin and this is your monday sport briefing. he wins a first golf made of his career after an incredible final—round of us open. the only player to post underpass score in the notoriously difficult course. e1 four basic shots in the end, by clear of the field ahead of fellow american. the south african was two shots further back. he becomes only the second player to win the men's open with a score underpass. in the english premier league, champions liverpool brushed aside title contenders chelsea.
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mane was found in the first half, and any second half of them pay. two goals in four minutes, the second after chasing down a poor clearance to still be win at stamford bridge. and a big win for tottenham too, son heung—min scored four goals as they came from behind to beat southampton 5—2. the south korean international was set up by harry kane for all of them — to get the match ball — while kane got their other. juventus began life under new manager andrea pirlo with a comfortable 3—0 win against sampdoria. in their serie a opener, cristiano ronaldo rounding out the goals after strikes from dejan kulusevski and leonardo bonucci. elsewhere, genoa and napoli also won their opening games. world number one novak djokovic goes for a 5th italian open later on monday — he'll face diego schwartzman in the final. djokovic had to save two set points in the first set
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against casper ruud before he found his groove to reach the championship match 7—5, 6—3. he's nowjust one win away from a record—breaking 36th masters title. before that, simona halep has the chance to win her first italian open, when she faces the defending champion karolina pliskova. the world number two halep overcame garbine muguruza in the semi—finals — extending her winning streak to 13 matches in a row. england's women play their first international cricket match since march on monday with the first of five t20 games against west indies. the sides last played each other six months ago, at the t20 world cup in australia, where england got the better, but after the long break the sides are eager to play again. we've been together for a while, what feels like a while now. we started off at the beginning of this month or something. so it has been a long time coming really and i think, i can safely say that eve ryo ne think, i can safely say that everyone is really ready to go
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tomorrow. and in what would be towards the end of the season anyway. yes, looking forward to actually buying some cricket. now we've seen cats, dogs and even the odd misplaced parachuter appear unexpectedly on football pitches over the years, but non league side ilkley town in west yorkshire had a surprise guest over the weekend. in their match with carlton athletic, an alpaca made a surprise appearance and halted play temporarily. where is he going? the defender here shows him the shoulder and here shows him the shoulder and he is off. you can get all the latest sports news at our website — that's bbc.com/sport. but from me — gavin ramjaun — and the rest of the sport team — that's your monday sport briefing. that is indeed and we will fully brief you on all of the top business stories in around about four minutes time so do stay with us. i am sally bundock. if you want to follow
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me on twitter, i am at sally bundock usa. i'll be back with all of the top business stories so do not go anywhere. —— bbc. hello there. in many places over the weekend, it felt like summer — with temperatures as high as 25 degrees. the new week gets off to a summery start as well, but it will not end that way. things through this week are going to become much more autumnal, as this band of cloud starts to work its way in our direction. now, this area of cloud is going to bring some outbreaks of rain, but it also separates the relatively warm air we have had lately from some much, much colder air, which is going to head our way, sweeping in from the northwest, as we head through the coming days. but in the shorter term, through monday morning, some mist and fog, some low cloud too, could affect parts of england and wales. that will tend to clear as we go through the day, and then it should be largely dry and sunny.
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sunnier than it was on sunday across northeast england, and also southeast scotland brighter. some sunshine into parts of aberdeenshire. temperatures in aberdeen getting up to around 19 degrees. but for western scotland and northern ireland, with more cloud, more of a breeze, it will be just a touch cooler at 16 or 17 degrees. now, as we had through monday night into tuesday, we will see extensive cloud across the northwest of the uk, and the first signs of some outbreaks of rain. some pretty heavy rain into the far north and west. further south, some clear spells, a relatively mild night — certainly compared with some of the nights we will have later in the week. and then into tuesday, for england and wales, it's largely dry, could be the odd shower in the west, but for northern ireland and scotland, we see thicker cloud, we see outbreaks of rain. it will be increasingly windy. we could have gusts close to 50 mph in the far northwest. ahead of that band of cloud and rain, it's still relatively warm. in fact, we could get to 25 degrees towards the southeast corner. but that warmth will not last. through tuesday night, into wednesday morning, we see this band of rain, our weather front pushing
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further south eastwards, and behind it, as the winds switch around to northwesterlies, things turn much, much colder. so, for wednesday morning, scotland and northern ireland starting the day at 5 or 6 degrees. 16 degrees in southeast england but, even here, it's going to turn cooler through wednesday, as this frontal system moves its way through. it will bring some rain in places during wednesday, but see how the temperatures drop. it stays much, much cooler by day and by night as we head towards the end of the week, with further wind and rain at times.
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you are with news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around world, a very warm welcome, i sally bundock. leads document reveal how some uk banks have allowed criminals and moneylenders to move billions of pounds around the world. president trump gives his blessing to oracle ‘s investment in tiktok, but has his demand been met in full? and how do you make your business boom during the pandemic? we talk to a royal florist.
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let's focus on the key business stories, and more on the leaked documents that have revealed how some of the uk's best—known banks have allowed criminals, money launderers and sanctioned russians to move dirty money around the world. the secret banking reports also show how major banks have failed to stop crime when they have suspected it. they show that london is a hub for money—laundering with billions of dollars of suspected dirty money moving through the financial system. the documents known as the fincen files were leaked to buzzfeed news and shared with the bbc by the international consortium of investigative journalists. more now from academics corresponded, who explains how british banks were implicated by these leaked documents. july 2012, a senate committee
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published a devastating report, saying it was being used as a condiment for drug kingpins and rogue nations and specifically, that the spectacular failures of oversight had led the bank to permits drug traffickers to lord $881 million of drug money, notjust lord $881 million of drug money, not just any lord $881 million of drug money, notjust any drug traffickers, this was the sinaloa drug cartel, made famous in the netflix series, el chapo. they just famous in the netflix series, el chapo. theyjust got off prosecution for that and we a lwa ys prosecution for that and we always found out four years later the george osborne had intervened on their behalf, seeking to help them avoid criminal prosecution, and saying that if they were prosecuted in my present threats to financial stability, so asa threats to financial stability, so as a result, they have a deferred prosecution agreement instead which is like a five year probation period where they have to give the nose clea n they have to give the nose clean and yet, we found out only from this leak that this stuff was going on in that.. hsbc is by no means the only bank singled out here. these
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are suspicious activity reports from all banks around the world, and they are obliged under anti— money laundering regulations to say when they see any kind of sign of suspicious activity, when for example they don't know whether money is coming from, but u nfortu nately money is coming from, but unfortunately the uk does appear to be at the centre of this. more than 3000 companies in these reports are british companies, more than any other country, and we have a problem here as well with anonymity. the way things are you can set up the way things are you can set up companies quite easily, nominate someone else is the director and hide your control about money, and in some cases you have a in turnovers of £23,000 and hundreds of millions of dollars are passing through these same companies, so there are growing calls for the government to do something about the lack money—laundering controls, especially when we know from the files that the secret us intelligence report has described us, the uk, is a higher riskjurisdiction, has described us, the uk, is a higher risk jurisdiction, on the same level as cyprus, maybe not what used to. that is our
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economics correspondent, just saying that hsbc shares currently trading in hong kong and earlier today they were down by nearly 3%, the lowest level for hsbc shares for 25 yea rs, level for hsbc shares for 25 years, and a hong kong list of shares have charted down 2.7%. uk finance which is a trade association for british banking has given us this statement. protecting the security, prosperity and reputation of the uk from the significant threat of economic crime is an absolute priority for the banking and finance industry. the sector spends over £5 billion each year fighting economic crime. these activities fully comply with all regulatory and legislative requirements. four of — for our viewers in the uk, you can see
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the full panorama, that will be on bbc one tonight at seven p.m.. it will also be on bbc world news in the nearfuture as well. ajudge in san francisco has blocked a us government attempts to ban the chinese messaging app wechat. isa chinese messaging app wechat. is a major setback for president trump. he says it is a threat to national security, but wechat is not the only chinese app under us scrutiny at the moment. president trump also wanted to ban tiktok, sometime ago, which is owned the chinese company by to dance — bytedance. he did a deal over the weekend for the apps us operations. let's talk this through with chris campbell, formerly the assistant secretary of the treasury of the financial institutions,
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that was from 2017 to 2018. thank you so much for being on the programme. can you tell me what you think about this situation with wechat? and the intervention of a us judge? situation with wechat? and the intervention of a usjudge?m isa intervention of a usjudge?m is a setback for the trump administration, but i think it will be a temporary setback, i'm sure they will very quickly go to i'm sure they will very quickly gotoa i'm sure they will very quickly go to a higherjudge, a higher court in the united states and seek a reversal of this, obviously from their perspective it sounds like they believe there is a significant national security challenges with wechat operating in the united states. but there are ways around it. tiktok look like it could be a thing of the past, it is now teaming up with oracle and walmart. tell us about that deal, and what it means for oracle. this is a significant step forward, having to iconic us companies are sharing a 20% stake in the
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new tiktok global. having four or five board seats in the new tiktok global. having four orfive board seats in the us and obviously, all of this was subject to a review in the united states, and it looks like it will go forward, allowing people in the united states and abroad to be able to participate in tiktok as they have known it, but it appears that folks of the united states will have a barrier from the tra nsfer of will have a barrier from the transfer of personal information of us citizens over to china when it comes to tiktok users. from your perspective, work tiktok and wechat, are they a national security threat? when i served the administration, whether i was briefed on matters of national security, i can't go
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into those, but i will say that there is, there are significant challenges when companies that are not wholly owned but privately, there are laws in china that require companies to participate with the chinese government when it comes to their intelligence gathering, and we don't have those same requirements here in the united states, and other companies in the world don't have that as well and with those requirements come significant risk for people in the united states, and anywhere in the world participating in companies that are chinese owned, but again, prudent minds and prudent planning can come to some deal, it looks like it has happened with this tiktok deal, and i am certain because ofiam deal, and i am certain because of i am aware of how this works, there will be safeguards
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put in place that will protect americans using tiktok at least, and for many other apps that go through this review. we will watch this space. thanks for your time and expertise. let's ta ke let's take you to south korea next where exports have returned to growth. expanding nearly 4% actually in the first 20 days of september compared to the year before. is the first increase they have seen for six months, and we have a journalist looking into this for us. tell us a bit more about south korea. is this a good turning point for them? we are all looking for signs of some sort of economic recovery right? but i think it is better to say that these are still early days for south korea although the data as you were talking about it certainly indicates that things are looking up, partly that was
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helped by microchip and car sales in the trade reliant economy, that's a big deal because of course, the export sector makes up a big chunk of the economy there, and exports grew by about 4% as you were saying from a year earlier, and imports declined some 7% on the year. why do we look at these export sales? it gives us an indication whether a country is able to sell some of its key products to other consumers, which gives us a general sense of economic demand, and as we have been reporting consistently on the channel, demand around the world has been hit by the pandemic, so on the surface, these figures are looking encouraging by digging deeper, and those positive export figures are a result of two more working days and the result than they were last year, which actually shows things may not be picking up as quickly as we had hoped. thank you for now. let's bring you some other business stories. the financial times is
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reporting the uk chancellor is to extend the treasury's uk wide programme business support loa ns to wide programme business support loans to the economy through what the chief medical officer has warned could be a very challenging wynter. the ft says plans to extend the four loan schemes which have already backed £53 billion in loans through government guarantees will be unveiled this week. the closure of passenger our links between the us and uk will strip at least 1a 21 cents billion off uk gross domestic product this year. — $14.21 billion. london's heathrow airport, the airline's uk trade group and airport services group and airport services group will be hit hard. let's focus on the uk economy and all of this talk that we are in a critical point at the moment in the coronavirus pandemic and its progression, and actually, the government's chief medical officer ‘s warning we are
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heading in the wrong direction. there's all kinds of course after the prime minister spent the weekend considering whether to introduce further measures in england, but what would another wide—ranging lockdown due to the already very weak uk economy? let's discuss this with janet, investment director and an important company. are you concerned about the impact on the uk economy of further lockdown and more stricter measures? yes, i think that would be definitely very devastating for the uk economy. what we see now is that there isa what we see now is that there is a gradual recovery in the economic data, and perhaps for some of the measures such as the retail sales, is there they are surpassing pre— covered levels of. there is a lot of pent—up demand, people were locked in their homes for a couple of months, so if we do
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have another lockdown to varying extent, that pent—up demand has already gone and we know that some of the government support measures, it may be gradually winding down. we may actually get to see an extension of some of these measures but it is likely that the measures we are seeing will be less strong than previously, soi be less strong than previously, so i think a lot of the economic risks that we fear may materialise, such as a search in the unemployment, and a pickup in the unemployment rate —aitis pickup in the unemployment rate — a it is already quite hampered by the ongoing virus and the potential uncertainty in the brexit negotiations. as we mentioned ft the is reporting that business support loa ns reporting that business support loans could be extended, do you think, if there are more stricter measures introduced, there will be more pressure on there will be more pressure on the government to extend the furlough scheme as well which comes to an end next month. yes i would think so. it is unclear
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whether they will extend this programme but i think the lockdown is imposed by the government and there are very few things that businesses and their employees can do about it, so it is actually quite unfairon it, so it is actually quite unfair on these businesses to actually have two foot the bill, so if there is a second lockdown, i think it would be quite probable that some of these measures will have to be extended, because if not, i fear the unemployment rate will be picking up quite sharply and we already see that it is bigger in the single mother unemployment rate, rising to 4.4%, and there are wide expectations it will further pick to as high as 7.5% if nothing is done. is it really difficult to balance this right? we saw in number ten over the weekend, you have the chancellor there, you have the prime minister, who wants to boost the uk economy and encourage growth, and yet you have the scientists in the medical officers saying listen,
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if we don't take drastic action, we are going to see a massive spike in infection rates and possibly death as well. i think it is a fine balance to be struck, i think it is not just balance to be struck, i think it is notjust a uk problem by globally, but i think a full lockdown on a prolonged lockdown on a prolonged lockdown that we have seen before is highly unlikely. there are a lot of pressures from the economic side and also from the economic side and also from the economic side and also from the social side of things, i think people are not keen on being lockdown like we have seen before, so i think what going to see is perhaps a very minor lockdown in the hotspot areas, and maybe some curfew measures instead of the full—scale lockdown that we have seen, i think that would be quite unlikely. thanks for talking to you, thanks for getting up so early. to india where lawmakers passed contentious new regulations on
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sunday, sparking widespread protest from farmers, opposition and even government allies on the floor. the prime minister has called this a watershed moment for indian agriculture. hejoins us live he joins us live from hejoins us live from mumbai with more details. it sounds very controversial, what has been introduced and what has changed? well, sally, the three ordinances that have in fact been introduced and there are three orfour major been introduced and there are three or four major concerns farmers have about them. first up farmers have about them. first up is the deregulation of wholesale markets where farmers currently sell their goods with the new legislation, they wouldn't be allowed to sell directly from their farms to private players. what this basically does is make the jobs of middlemen and commissioning agents redundant. it would also potentially deprive state governments, earning crucial tax revenues from these markets. farmers bodies are also concerned that this would perhaps be the first step towards dismantling a minimum
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support prices the government pays when it procure screens from farmers. there is also another legislation that basically says that stocking limits for essential commodities would no longer apply and this, farm bodies believe, will lead to a corporatisation of indian agriculture and the shift of the bargaining powerfrom the small power to the big guy. the prime minister, narendra modi has come out and allayed some of those concerns. he says many of those concerns. he says many of those concerns. he says many of those fears are unfounded. several economists and policymakers believe there is absolutely crucial reforms for the modernisation of agriculture. but the manner in which they were passed in the upper house of the indian parliament, many critics say was undemocratic. the opposition of course saying that it wasn't consultant enough and so we are likely to see an intensification of these protest going forward. so far, they have been maintained in they have been maintained in the couple of states, including punjab, and perhaps they would now push over into the state of rajasthan where we believe there is likely to be a strike
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loss on these markets today. 0k, loss on these markets today. ok, thank you therefrom mumbai. still to come on bbc news. how do you make your business plumage during the pandemic? most big events are cancelled. we will get the words of wisdom from a royal florist. thatin that in just that injust a that in just a moment but first of all, some of the stories in uk. the children's commissioner is going on the government to prioritise testing for schools alongside health workers and ca re alongside health workers and care homes or risk throwing away all the hard work it took to get children back into schools in september. she is urging parents to hold their nerve and keep children in school in the midst of rising cases. the commissioner's research suggests that around one in 20 children in england are out of school due to issues linked the pandemic and local lockdowns. this way,
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universities across the country a welcoming new and old stu d e nts a welcoming new and old students onto campuses for the first time since the lockdown. but residents of england's university towns and cities fear a rise in cases as stu d e nts to fear a rise in cases as students to come back was not ina students to come back was not in a survey carried out in 25 university towns, more than half of local residents said they felt the return of stu d e nts they felt the return of students would lead to extra restrictions being put in place. here in bbc news, it is brea kfast place. here in bbc news, it is breakfast at six a.m.. you are with bbc news. a reminder of the top stories. leaked documents reveal how some uk banks have allowed criminals and money launderers to move billions of pounds around the world. england's chief medical officer once the country is at a critical point as ministers consider new measures to stop the upsurge in coronavirus cases.
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argentina is introducing a new law which says that 1% of all governmentjobs must go to transgender people. governmentjobs must go to tra nsgender people. this governmentjobs must go to transgender people. this comes after a state run bank announced last month it would introduce a similar quota scheme. the government says it's labour decree paste back a debt to the trans community which up until now has been largely shut out of the labour market.
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now onto flower power. flowers have proved very popular during lockdown, certainly in the uk with plants and flowers among the top three items most commonly bought. for the businesses that supply them,
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the pandemic has not been so rosy. in the uk, the market for cut flowers and ornamental pla nts cut flowers and ornamental plants was left 1.3 billion pounds in 2018. that is nearly $1.7 billion. with offices shut, weddings proponent and events cancelled, growers and suppliers have been severely challenged. i am suppliers have been severely challenged. iam nowjoined by simon lycett who is event and royal florist. simon lycett who is event and royalflorist. simon, lovely to have you on the program. so how have you on the program. so how have you on the program. so how have you been running your business during this unprecedented time? what if you had to do that has been different? the first tragic thing i have had to do is make redundancies because i am an event florist and like tens of thousands of events based businesses around the world, since lockdown, we have had no work whatsoever. small, micro weddings for six people are not the sort of work we would ever do. we are used to working in
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vast venues and creating flowers for weddings for two or 300 people. so you have had to make redundancies, which as you say, is a horrible thing to do for any business leader but i presume they are highly skilled individuals you have had to lay off? which will be hard to find when businesses return, will they? they will be hard to find. many of them are brilliantly loyal and have been with me for 15 or 20 years as i grow my business. as a small independent business i was proud of having created something from nothing. and in giving employment to people and helping them to be able to be living and paying mortgages and having an enjoyable life and lifestyle. and now i feel utterly helpless that all of that has gone. i am hopeful that has gone. i am hopeful that it will return but i don't think it is going to return until april, may next year. who would be planning to have an event with the current circumstances and with so much being so much unknown? in terms
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of your suppliers, how have they been impacted because presumably, there's been a huge drop in demand for flowers even though, you know, households are buying more flowers. that will just not the fill the void thatis will just not the fill the void that is there because of events. it doesn't sadly. the flower market where i buy all my flower and plant material, they are trading at about 20% of what they normally would do. and it is almost unsustainable and we're looking at the months of april, may, june, july, september — these are big wedding months. these are the amounts where people have parties and dinners and all of thatis parties and dinners and all of that is now gone. it is going to bea that is now gone. it is going to be a really, really tough, tough struggle for wholesale suppliers of flowers, for growers , suppliers of flowers, for growers, for anybody within the events industry, caterers, production companies, all of those amazing venues throughout the country — all of them, we
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are all on our knees. ora, simon went up to leave it there. sorry to interrupt you. thank you so much for being on the program and good luck. it brings so muchjoy the program and good luck. it brings so much joy doesn't have that kind of business and the event business, i will see you soon. hello there. in many places over the weekend, it felt like summer — with temperatures as high as 25 degrees. the new week gets off to a summery start as well, but it will not end that way. things through this week are going to become much more autumnal, as this band of cloud starts to work its way in our direction. now, this area of cloud is going to bring some outbreaks of rain, but it also separates the relatively warm air we have had lately from some much, much colder air, which is going to head our way, sweeping in from the northwest, as we head through the coming days. but in the shorter term, through monday morning, some mist and fog, some low cloud too, could affect parts of england and wales. that will tend to clear as we go through the day, and then it should be
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largely dry and sunny. sunnier than it was on sunday across northeast england, and also southeast scotland brighter. some sunshine into parts of aberdeenshire. temperatures in aberdeen getting up to around 19 degrees. but for western scotland and northern ireland, with more cloud, more of a breeze, it will be just a touch cooler at 16 or 17 degrees. now, as we had through monday night into tuesday, we will see extensive cloud across the northwest of the uk, and the first signs of some outbreaks of rain. some pretty heavy rain into the far north and west. further south, some clear spells, a relatively mild night — certainly compared with some of the nights we will have later in the week. and then into tuesday, for england and wales, it's largely dry, could be the odd shower in the west, but for northern ireland and scotland, we see thicker cloud, we see outbreaks of rain. it will be increasingly windy. we could have gusts close to 50 mph in the far northwest. ahead of that band of cloud and rain,
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it's still relatively warm. in fact, we could get to 25 degrees towards the southeast corner. but that warmth will not last. through tuesday night, into wednesday morning, we see this band of rain, our weather front pushing further south eastwards, and behind it, as the winds switch around to northwesterlies, things turn much, much colder. so, for wednesday morning, scotland and northern ireland starting the day at 5 or 6 degrees. 16 degrees in southeast england but, even here, it's going to turn cooler through wednesday, as this frontal system moves its way through. it will bring some rain in places during wednesday, but see how the temperatures drop. it stays much, much cooler by day and by night as we head towards the end of the week, with further wind and rain at times.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: we're at a "critical point in the pandemic". that's the warning from england's chief medical officer who says coronavirus numbers are going in "the wrong direction" and just as that warning drops, we will be live at the university, tens of thousands of students across the country begin their first day back at university. what can they expect and could contribute to a rise in
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infections? iam in i am in the north—east and venues like

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